Welcome December

I love to welcome December each year. This starts the winter months, a holiday season and a time for inner reflection for me. In December I start to think of beyond the first of the year. My garden lay dormant and I start to think of the colors to come. I start cooking comfort foods such as tomato soup and grilled cheese sandwiches, baked chickens and baking, always baking deserts for the soul. And then there is the nesting, being reacquainted with my knitting projects and spending time in the art room.

Winter snow in the forest during the December Dawn.
Winter snow in the forest during the December dawn.

But of course before the calm comes the storm of the winter holiday season. I’ll be working on more holiday designs (they are in my head now hollering to be created) to share here. Also in the works fun gift ideas including custom mugs with matching hot chocolate combos. Or foiled photo cards you can personalize with your own photos and custom text and much more.

In the meantime I hope you find a little peace in the craziness.

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Spring Lilies

Spring is here in New England, though you wouldn’t know it from the snow that was dumped on us yesterday. Here on the coast we received over 8 inches of the sparkling white powder. Within 12 hours the sun was doing what it does best and melting away the last of winter.

What a strange winter we are leaving behind. Warm weather quite early in March has awoken the plants in the garden. Crocus have come and gone, the rhubarb, chocolate mint and columbine show signs of green coming above the dirt. The day lilies (shown below) are surrounded in the last of yesterdays winter. Underneath the white are last Autumn’s leaves to be raked. But for now, I’ll have to wait for the leaves to dry before removing them. I can sit back and enjoy the sun streaming into my windows.

Shoots of green day lily leaves found in the snow.
March’s snow is no match for the sun.
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Full Moon In December

The full moon in December is aptly named the Cold Moon. Signifying the seasons lengthening winter nights many Native American nations called the full moon in December the Long Nights Moon. I’ve always loved waking on a winter’s night to see the shadows a full moon plays on the snow. It’s as if a spotlight shown on the wilderness normally darken to us most during night.

In began as a pencil sketch

This painting was sketched prior to using paint. The initial drawing below shows the first conceptual art I created prior to the full moon in December. The snow was had only arrived as wisps of flakes from the sky when pencil met paper. Cold gripped New England a few days before the real snow fell and by then I had decided to pursue the painting. That night was the full moon in December.A pencil sketch of bare trees, the moon and a deer

Moonlight on snow

That very evening I woke after midnight and stole out of the bed to look out the window. It was a cloudless night and the cold moon was so very bright. There were no features on the moon, no man in the moon lay on the lunar surface. A magical white opaque halo spun around the moon like gauze. The sky was navy blue and black, infinite with twinkling stars that appear as diamonds.

Snow isn’t white in the night but seems to take on the colors of the night sky. Tinted with navy blue and gray you can see where dips and valleys lay on the snow. The surface of cold crystals was unbroken by footfalls.

The trees dark, bare and tall threw their shadows in bumpy lines towards the house. At the base of the trunks white hair lip snow piles had formed by the winter breeze. It was the finest half hour I’ve spent in some time. In the quiet of the house, I took mental note of the colors, textures and feeling for painting Moonlight on Snow.

painting of a full moon in winter with bare trees and a deer.

Of course the deer was in my imagination though I know something, a mammal or owl, was out there enjoying the full moon in December.

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