September Thoughts

As I sit and wonder where summer has snuck off to my mind happily glides towards September thoughts. I so much enjoy the Autumn months and September blends its’ warm days and cool nights together gently. The garden is still giving late tomatoes, the sedum is alive with desperate bees. It is not unusual to see a shock of yellow leaves from the beech trees.

The squirrels have decimated the acorn and beech nuts leaving the nut husks to cover the back lawn. Hummingbirds used to be at my feeder all summer long. They have left but the feeder remains for those late comers flying south for winter.

Some of the best seasonal poetry is for Autumn. Like my post entitled October I often think of poems when painting or designing. One such poem caught my eye as I was reading poetry written by Emily Bronte. Here it is entitled Fall, leaves, fall

Fall, leaves fall

Fall, leaves, fall; die, flowers, away;
Lengthen night and shorten day;
Every leaf speaks bliss to me
Fluttering from the autumn tree.
I shall smile when wreaths of snow
Blossom where the rose should grow;
I shall sing when night’s decay
Ushers in a drearier day.

I love this poem, stark and embracing the change to come. The lines “Every leaf speaks bliss to me, fluttering from the autumn tree.” stands on their own. I have paired the phrase with one of my autumn leaf pictures (also featured on my Colorful Birch Leaf). I hope you like it.

Colorful autumn leaf photograph with a line from Emily Bronte's poem.
Emily Bronte’s Fall, leaves fall poem was inspirational.

I hope you enjoy your autumn season too. The winter is not very far away now. When spring finally arrives we can have our autumn dreams too look forward to. For now I enjoy sharing with you my September thoughts.

If you enjoy my picture above, it may be of interest you to know you can purchase blank cards and postcards.

Please follow and like us:

Found Treasure From The Sea

I can’t believe summer has come and gone. Because of our lack of rain September slipped by masking itself in the unusual warm weather. As I sit and look out the window I see a few maple trees already have put on their red leaves. Some trees have lost many leaves while others are still a summer green.

Last weekend I started to clean the garden. Collecting seeds for spring, trimming dead branches and even planting a few new plants. I started by digging a hole for my newly purchased Japanese Anemone. This variety of Anemone caught my eye not only because of the delicate pink flowers but that this plant also blooms in September. With our recent warm weather this Autumn the flowers are still blooming.

Japanese Anemone variety "September Charm"
Japanese Anemone variety “September Charm”.

Creating holes and moving dirt give me a sense of accomplishment. I believe it is the same feeling when painting or any other creative process. The work is more physical than what I do in the art room but has that same lasting vibe of a job well done.

Digging on this property sometimes yields treasure. I’ve dug up colored bottles, kids toys and less exciting objects too. Occasionally I find bits of clam shells or beads. This day I found a rare treat. Three preserved seashells fully intact filled with dirt and buried almost 12 inches deep. Upon washing them I found their brittle shells had worn quite thin. I tried to clean their insides but found the dirt is keeping their shape together.

Three seashells on a post.
Found treasure from the sea

These three seashells stayed on this deck post for several days. One morning I found a squirrel was investigating them. He picked up the two on each end and threw them on the ground. The shell in the middle he took, with difficulty, and hopped away into the woods. I guess he had found his treasure from the sea.

Please follow and like us:

Something Delicate In The Garden

Today’s simple post is something delicate in the garden. Someone once asked me why I spent so much time planning and working in a flower garden. Truth be told my body is having a hard time dealing with the physical labor of this hobby. But I do love seeing plants grow and watching flower buds mature into blossoms. I also enjoy deriving inspiration for art projects or simple sketching of flowers.

I also enjoy the instant gratification of capturing flowers by taking pictures of them with the camera. This is my way of remembering their names or identifying species of wildflowers I find while walking or hiking in the wood.

Today’s picture is of the new Geum Rivale plant I purchased a few days ago. This delicate beauty’s name is Flames of Passion. The flowers remind me of an English garden and their old fashion style is right up my alley for taste. They inspire me to pull out my watercolors and try to capture their coloring. Who knows where they’ll bring my imagination.

Geum Rivale, Flames of Passion
A delicate addition to the garden, Geum Rivale reminds my of mini poppies.

 

Please follow and like us:

Colors Of May

The colors of May are varied and numerous. Delicate white, soft pink and bold orange are just a few of the colors of May in our yard. From wildflowers to domestic nursery plants these flowering plants on this post are popping up all around me. Here is a small sample of the colors of May I am sharing with you today.

The first offering are the fragrant white and pink apple blossoms. This apple tree produces lovely flowers each spring though we never seem to have apples to show for it.

Pink and white apple blossoms.
Pink and white apple blossoms are very fragrant.

Blue eyed grass is quite ordinary looking until their small five petaled lavender colored flowers appear. Often found in ditches and along woodland edges, I find them just as lovely as nursery plants in bloom.

Blue eyed grass flowers
Blue eyed grass blossoms provide lovely color in a small way.

This flower of the Mock Olive bush is one of my personal favorites. These small but fragrant blossoms are hard to spot but worth the look. Growing beside the driveway it appears to get larger each year.

Mock olive blossoms
Hung like little white fairy bells the mock olive flowers are so pretty.

The columbine varieties always are prolific in the spring. Below I’ve captured a delicate pink and a large collection of the common purple varieties.

Pale pink columbine.
Delicate pale pink columbine is a spring treat.

Every fall I sprinkle the columbine seed pods all over a stone patio we rarely use. Each spring we see a huge number of these hardy columbine spring into color.

Purple Columbine And  Cedar Shingles
Columbine are easily planted by seed each fall.

This bold orange spike of flowers are called Siberian Wallflowers. I had never seen them until I planted a wildflower mix on a hill I didn’t want to mow any longer. What a surprise to see such colors in May!

Orange Siberian Wallflower
The Siberian Wallflower is anything but quiet.

These two wildflowers are wonderful companions on the wildflower hill. The Baby Blue Eyed and the Thyme-leaved Speedwell grow close to the ground. The thyme-leaved speedwell is found where ever green things grow. Not to be mixed up with its’ cousin the common speedwell, these tiny white lobed flowers are hard to see.

Baby Blue Eyed and Thyme-leaved Speedwell
Creeping along the ground are the baby blue eyed and thyme-leaved speedwell.

This simple yellow flower is called a Fringed Loosestrife. In May, a large variety of yellow flowers all very seemingly the same blossom along roads, on lawns and in the forest. When you look closely you will find these yellow five petaled flowers are not all the same.

Yellow Fringed Loosestrife
This sweet little yellow flower was found by my driveway.

I hope you have enjoyed my post Colors of May. I’m sure you have seen blossoming colors this month whether it was in the dirt beside the road or in your own gardens. Because I enjoy putting names to flowers I find, I try to observe more nature than time allows. May every day be filled with the colors of nature for you.

Please follow and like us:

First Flowers In Spring

The first flowers in Spring to show their silent beauty were the Lenton roses, English daisies and the delicate white magnolia blossoms. I believe Spring is truly here to stay in New England. Though currently there is a steady rain and heavy mist, we have had sunshine more times often than naught.

Taking advantage of a fresh clear blue sky, I captured the small but fragrant white blossoms on our magnolia tree.

Magnolia In Spring
Short lived fragrant white magnolia flowers

Sun loving English daisies are spreading over our wildflower hill. They are the first wildflowers to bloom this spring. With the white and pink variety, the hill is awash in small flowers.

In the dappled shade of the main garden are the purple bell shaped Lenton roses. Their blooms last so long they sustain color in the garden until the columbine show their variety of colored flowers. This Lenton rose plant is approximately 8 years old. I can’t imagine the garden without it.

Lenton Rose 16
Most favorite spring time blossoms from the Lenton rose

And lastly, the promise of delicious fruit crisps, pies and compotes sit in the noon day sun. As the rhubarb plants gather strength from the sun, I removed their flowers to create a hardier plant to produce tasty stalks.

Rhubarb Leaves
Rhubarb plants in the sunshine
Please follow and like us:

Spring Lilies

Spring is here in New England, though you wouldn’t know it from the snow that was dumped on us yesterday. Here on the coast we received over 8 inches of the sparkling white powder. Within 12 hours the sun was doing what it does best and melting away the last of winter.

What a strange winter we are leaving behind. Warm weather quite early in March has awoken the plants in the garden. Crocus have come and gone, the rhubarb, chocolate mint and columbine show signs of green coming above the dirt. The day lilies (shown below) are surrounded in the last of yesterdays winter. Underneath the white are last Autumn’s leaves to be raked. But for now, I’ll have to wait for the leaves to dry before removing them. I can sit back and enjoy the sun streaming into my windows.

Shoots of green day lily leaves found in the snow.
March’s snow is no match for the sun.
Please follow and like us:

Colorful Birch Leaf

My favorite time of the year is fall. Perhaps because I love change and become excited in the changes found in nature with each season. The cooler days, different smells from the forest and cooking with gourds gives me that feeling of nesting to come. Farmer’s markets brim over with jams, homemade pickles and lot’s and lot’s of apple products.

Strangely enough I start reading more poetry during the fall and winter months. I enjoy the poems of Elizabeth Barrett Browning such as her 1833 poem “The Autumn”. I give you the first stanza below.

“Go, sit upon the lofty hill,
And turn your eyes around,
Where waving woods and waters wild
Do hymn an autumn sound.
The summer sun is faint on them —
The summer flowers depart —
Sit still — as all transform’d to stone,
Except your musing heart.”

Capturing the colors of fall are easy however, finding those leaves or scenes that are unique are harder to find. When I was younger I would draw the individual leaves during their transformation from green to brown. Admiring each leafs individual color patterns always intrigued me.

Colorful birch leaf of gold, green and rust brown.
Colorful Birch Leaf

I don’t draw them now though occasionally I still find ways of capturing them into immortality. The colorful birch leaf below is an example of the symmetry of changing colors. The veins of golden yellow, what is left of the green and its fringes of brown on the tips creates a magic only nature can know.

I share this image with you on a wooden canvas print. It is available in 8” x 10”, 11” x 14” and 18” x 24”. The wood is high quality birch wood (how fitting) and printed with eco friendly inks. A beautiful presentation with wood grain accents, this wooden print is stunning. Click on the image above to find pricing.

Enjoy your Autumn season.

SaveSave

Please follow and like us: