Orange Kiwi

You know I am not happy unless I am learning something new. I wish I could be one of those creative people who sticks to one kind of art medium. However, my brain is wired to try everything like a greedy child.

My interest in digital art using a software program came from enjoying those wonderfully unique digital artworks found online. So once again I took a community college course and am learning how Adobe Photoshop works. The ingenious software program has tools that creates real time magic. There are many fun tools (I fear I’ll never learn them all) that makes playing an endless amusement.

I had no idea how much fun this new adventure would be. Now that the course is wrapping up, I am sure I’ll continue to learn using the gazillion tutorials found online. For now, here is my first attempt at creating a digitally surreal picture entitled Orange Kiwi.

Orange Kiwi wm

I am sure most people would say Orange Kiwi is pretty basic. Though this girl is a beginner at this medium, I hope to become better at it as I take on more projects. I love to watch Jason Kim’s speed paints on YouTube. Very inspirational and quite a high bar to meet for sure. In the meantime keep creating and working your right side of your brain my friends.

Found Treasure From The Sea

I can’t believe summer has come and gone. Because of our lack of rain September slipped by masking itself in the unusual warm weather. As I sit and look out the window I see a few maple trees already have put on their red leaves. Some trees have lost many leaves while others are still a summer green.

Last weekend I started to clean the garden. Collecting seeds for spring, trimming dead branches and even planting a few new plants. I started by digging a hole for my newly purchased Japanese Anemone. This variety of Anemone caught my eye not only because of the delicate pink flowers but that this plant also blooms in September. With our recent warm weather this Autumn the flowers are still blooming.

Japanese Anemone variety "September Charm"
Japanese Anemone variety “September Charm”.

Creating holes and moving dirt give me a sense of accomplishment. I believe it is the same feeling when painting or any other creative process. The work is more physical than what I do in the art room but has that same lasting vibe of a job well done.

Digging on this property sometimes yields treasure. I’ve dug up colored bottles, kids toys and less exciting objects too. Occasionally I find bits of clam shells or beads. This day I found a rare treat. Three preserved seashells fully intact filled with dirt and buried almost 12 inches deep. Upon washing them I found their brittle shells had worn quite thin. I tried to clean their insides but found the dirt is keeping their shape together.

Three seashells on a post.
Found treasure from the sea

These three seashells stayed on this deck post for several days. One morning I found a squirrel was investigating them. He picked up the two on each end and threw them on the ground. The shell in the middle he took, with difficulty, and hopped away into the woods. I guess he had found his treasure from the sea.

Happy 4th of July

I remember when I didn’t sit in the house on the 4th of July and listen to the explosions in near by towns. Packing the car with children, bug spray, blankets and chairs to navigate through towns for the best views of the fireworks. I watched others, faces turned upwards with light from the pyrotechnics  display lighting their faces making them look like human fireflies. The symphony of collective “ohhhs” and “ahhhs” as the sky would pop and sizzle with light would end with wild applause after the night’s canvas was filled with smoke and burning retina sparks of color. I think tonight I will venture out to see what magic the night holds.

Have a safe holiday everyone!

A girl holding a sparkler with a 4th of July message.

Something Delicate In The Garden

Today’s simple post is something delicate in the garden. Someone once asked me why I spent so much time planning and working in a flower garden. Truth be told my body is having a hard time dealing with the physical labor of this hobby. But I do love seeing plants grow and watching flower buds mature into blossoms. I also enjoy deriving inspiration for art projects or simple sketching of flowers.

I also enjoy the instant gratification of capturing flowers by taking pictures of them with the camera. This is my way of remembering their names or identifying species of wildflowers I find while walking or hiking in the wood.

Today’s picture is of the new Geum Rivale plant I purchased a few days ago. This delicate beauty’s name is Flames of Passion. The flowers remind me of an English garden and their old fashion style is right up my alley for taste. They inspire me to pull out my watercolors and try to capture their coloring. Who knows where they’ll bring my imagination.

Geum Rivale, Flames of Passion
A delicate addition to the garden, Geum Rivale reminds my of mini poppies.

 

Colors Of May

The colors of May are varied and numerous. Delicate white, soft pink and bold orange are just a few of the colors of May in our yard. From wildflowers to domestic nursery plants these flowering plants on this post are popping up all around me. Here is a small sample of the colors of May I am sharing with you today.

The first offering are the fragrant white and pink apple blossoms. This apple tree produces lovely flowers each spring though we never seem to have apples to show for it.

Pink and white apple blossoms.
Pink and white apple blossoms are very fragrant.

Blue eyed grass is quite ordinary looking until their small five petaled lavender colored flowers appear. Often found in ditches and along woodland edges, I find them just as lovely as nursery plants in bloom.

Blue eyed grass flowers
Blue eyed grass blossoms provide lovely color in a small way.

This flower of the Mock Olive bush is one of my personal favorites. These small but fragrant blossoms are hard to spot but worth the look. Growing beside the driveway it appears to get larger each year.

Mock olive blossoms
Hung like little white fairy bells the mock olive flowers are so pretty.

The columbine varieties always are prolific in the spring. Below I’ve captured a delicate pink and a large collection of the common purple varieties.

Pale pink columbine.
Delicate pale pink columbine is a spring treat.

Every fall I sprinkle the columbine seed pods all over a stone patio we rarely use. Each spring we see a huge number of these hardy columbine spring into color.

Purple Columbine And  Cedar Shingles
Columbine are easily planted by seed each fall.

This bold orange spike of flowers are called Siberian Wallflowers. I had never seen them until I planted a wildflower mix on a hill I didn’t want to mow any longer. What a surprise to see such colors in May!

Orange Siberian Wallflower
The Siberian Wallflower is anything but quiet.

These two wildflowers are wonderful companions on the wildflower hill. The Baby Blue Eyed and the Thyme-leaved Speedwell grow close to the ground. The thyme-leaved speedwell is found where ever green things grow. Not to be mixed up with its’ cousin the common speedwell, these tiny white lobed flowers are hard to see.

Baby Blue Eyed and Thyme-leaved Speedwell
Creeping along the ground are the baby blue eyed and thyme-leaved speedwell.

This simple yellow flower is called a Fringed Loosestrife. In May, a large variety of yellow flowers all very seemingly the same blossom along roads, on lawns and in the forest. When you look closely you will find these yellow five petaled flowers are not all the same.

Yellow Fringed Loosestrife
This sweet little yellow flower was found by my driveway.

I hope you have enjoyed my post Colors of May. I’m sure you have seen blossoming colors this month whether it was in the dirt beside the road or in your own gardens. Because I enjoy putting names to flowers I find, I try to observe more nature than time allows. May every day be filled with the colors of nature for you.