Colors Of May

The colors of May are varied and numerous. Delicate white, soft pink and bold orange are just a few of the colors of May in our yard. From wildflowers to domestic nursery plants these flowering plants on this post are popping up all around me. Here is a small sample of the colors of May I am sharing with you today.

The first offering are the fragrant white and pink apple blossoms. This apple tree produces lovely flowers each spring though we never seem to have apples to show for it.

Pink and white apple blossoms.
Pink and white apple blossoms are very fragrant.

Blue eyed grass is quite ordinary looking until their small five petaled lavender colored flowers appear. Often found in ditches and along woodland edges, I find them just as lovely as nursery plants in bloom.

Blue eyed grass flowers
Blue eyed grass blossoms provide lovely color in a small way.

This flower of the Mock Olive bush is one of my personal favorites. These small but fragrant blossoms are hard to spot but worth the look. Growing beside the driveway it appears to get larger each year.

Mock olive blossoms
Hung like little white fairy bells the mock olive flowers are so pretty.

The columbine varieties always are prolific in the spring. Below I’ve captured a delicate pink and a large collection of the common purple varieties.

Pale pink columbine.
Delicate pale pink columbine is a spring treat.

Every fall I sprinkle the columbine seed pods all over a stone patio we rarely use. Each spring we see a huge number of these hardy columbine spring into color.

Purple Columbine And  Cedar Shingles
Columbine are easily planted by seed each fall.

This bold orange spike of flowers are called Siberian Wallflowers. I had never seen them until I planted a wildflower mix on a hill I didn’t want to mow any longer. What a surprise to see such colors in May!

Orange Siberian Wallflower
The Siberian Wallflower is anything but quiet.

These two wildflowers are wonderful companions on the wildflower hill. The Baby Blue Eyed and the Thyme-leaved Speedwell grow close to the ground. The thyme-leaved speedwell is found where ever green things grow. Not to be mixed up with its’ cousin the common speedwell, these tiny white lobed flowers are hard to see.

Baby Blue Eyed and Thyme-leaved Speedwell
Creeping along the ground are the baby blue eyed and thyme-leaved speedwell.

This simple yellow flower is called a Fringed Loosestrife. In May, a large variety of yellow flowers all very seemingly the same blossom along roads, on lawns and in the forest. When you look closely you will find these yellow five petaled flowers are not all the same.

Yellow Fringed Loosestrife
This sweet little yellow flower was found by my driveway.

I hope you have enjoyed my post Colors of May. I’m sure you have seen blossoming colors this month whether it was in the dirt beside the road or in your own gardens. Because I enjoy putting names to flowers I find, I try to observe more nature than time allows. May every day be filled with the colors of nature for you.

Book Sketch

On getting back to the basics I decided to start with a simple book sketch. For me, the exercise of working with perspective and vanishing points at the same time was an unexpected challenge.

It has been some time since I sat down and drew with a pencil. I had decided to take a local drawing class this past month. If you have never taken a local class, whether it be from a recreational center or small college, I highly recommend participating in one. The instruction was great and the company of others who were outgoing make the experience even better.

Our last class together we were given the task of drawing a pile of books. As you can see below my attempt at the assignment wasn’t too bad. In fact, for the most part I was able to execute the assignment fairly well. After this class I understood the importance of identifying a vanishing point and how to find them. As we know, practice makes perfect and I’ll definitely¬†give myself more opportunities to hone this skill.

Book Sketch
Simple sketch of a pile of books

I did learn one more lesson during this class. I need to find a better pencil and easer too. lol

Here is a shout out to our fun and knowledgable teacher Gayle Fitzpatrick. Gayle is a printmaker, paper maker and artist extraordinaire. You can find her Etsy shop here.

First Flowers In Spring

The first flowers in Spring to show their silent beauty were the Lenton roses, English daisies and the delicate white magnolia blossoms. I believe Spring is truly here to stay in New England. Though currently there is a steady rain and heavy mist, we have had sunshine more times often than naught.

Taking advantage of a fresh clear blue sky, I captured the small but fragrant white blossoms on our magnolia tree.

Magnolia In Spring
Short lived fragrant white magnolia flowers

Sun loving English daisies are spreading over our wildflower hill. They are the first wildflowers to bloom this spring. With the white and pink variety, the hill is awash in small flowers.

In the dappled shade of the main garden are the purple bell shaped Lenton roses. Their blooms last so long they sustain color in the garden until the columbine show their variety of colored flowers. This Lenton rose plant is approximately 8 years old. I can’t imagine the garden without it.

Lenton Rose 16
Most favorite spring time blossoms from the Lenton rose

And lastly, the promise of delicious fruit crisps, pies and compotes sit in the noon day sun. As the rhubarb plants gather strength from the sun, I removed their flowers to create a hardier plant to produce tasty stalks.

Rhubarb Leaves
Rhubarb plants in the sunshine