Found Treasure From The Sea

I can’t believe summer has come and gone. Because of our lack of rain September slipped by masking itself in the unusual warm weather. As I sit and look out the window I see a few maple trees already have put on their red leaves. Some trees have lost many leaves while others are still a summer green.

Last weekend I started to clean the garden. Collecting seeds for spring, trimming dead branches and even planting a few new plants. I started by digging a hole for my newly purchased Japanese Anemone. This variety of Anemone caught my eye not only because of the delicate pink flowers but that this plant also blooms in September. With our recent warm weather this Autumn the flowers are still blooming.

Japanese Anemone variety "September Charm"
Japanese Anemone variety “September Charm”.

Creating holes and moving dirt give me a sense of accomplishment. I believe it is the same feeling when painting or any other creative process. The work is more physical than what I do in the art room but has that same lasting vibe of a job well done.

Digging on this property sometimes yields treasure. I’ve dug up colored bottles, kids toys and less exciting objects too. Occasionally I find bits of clam shells or beads. This day I found a rare treat. Three preserved seashells fully intact filled with dirt and buried almost 12 inches deep. Upon washing them I found their brittle shells had worn quite thin. I tried to clean their insides but found the dirt is keeping their shape together.

Three seashells on a post.
Found treasure from the sea

These three seashells stayed on this deck post for several days. One morning I found a squirrel was investigating them. He picked up the two on each end and threw them on the ground. The shell in the middle he took, with difficulty, and hopped away into the woods. I guess he had found his treasure from the sea.

Please follow and like us:

Something Delicate In The Garden

Today’s simple post is something delicate in the garden. Someone once asked me why I spent so much time planning and working in a flower garden. Truth be told my body is having a hard time dealing with the physical labor of this hobby. But I do love seeing plants grow and watching flower buds mature into blossoms. I also enjoy deriving inspiration for art projects or simple sketching of flowers.

I also enjoy the instant gratification of capturing flowers by taking pictures of them with the camera. This is my way of remembering their names or identifying species of wildflowers I find while walking or hiking in the wood.

Today’s picture is of the new Geum Rivale plant I purchased a few days ago. This delicate beauty’s name is Flames of Passion. The flowers remind me of an English garden and their old fashion style is right up my alley for taste. They inspire me to pull out my watercolors and try to capture their coloring. Who knows where they’ll bring my imagination.

Geum Rivale, Flames of Passion
A delicate addition to the garden, Geum Rivale reminds my of mini poppies.

 

Please follow and like us:

Colors Of May

The colors of May are varied and numerous. Delicate white, soft pink and bold orange are just a few of the colors of May in our yard. From wildflowers to domestic nursery plants these flowering plants on this post are popping up all around me. Here is a small sample of the colors of May I am sharing with you today.

The first offering are the fragrant white and pink apple blossoms. This apple tree produces lovely flowers each spring though we never seem to have apples to show for it.

Pink and white apple blossoms.
Pink and white apple blossoms are very fragrant.

Blue eyed grass is quite ordinary looking until their small five petaled lavender colored flowers appear. Often found in ditches and along woodland edges, I find them just as lovely as nursery plants in bloom.

Blue eyed grass flowers
Blue eyed grass blossoms provide lovely color in a small way.

This flower of the Mock Olive bush is one of my personal favorites. These small but fragrant blossoms are hard to spot but worth the look. Growing beside the driveway it appears to get larger each year.

Mock olive blossoms
Hung like little white fairy bells the mock olive flowers are so pretty.

The columbine varieties always are prolific in the spring. Below I’ve captured a delicate pink and a large collection of the common purple varieties.

Pale pink columbine.
Delicate pale pink columbine is a spring treat.

Every fall I sprinkle the columbine seed pods all over a stone patio we rarely use. Each spring we see a huge number of these hardy columbine spring into color.

Purple Columbine And  Cedar Shingles
Columbine are easily planted by seed each fall.

This bold orange spike of flowers are called Siberian Wallflowers. I had never seen them until I planted a wildflower mix on a hill I didn’t want to mow any longer. What a surprise to see such colors in May!

Orange Siberian Wallflower
The Siberian Wallflower is anything but quiet.

These two wildflowers are wonderful companions on the wildflower hill. The Baby Blue Eyed and the Thyme-leaved Speedwell grow close to the ground. The thyme-leaved speedwell is found where ever green things grow. Not to be mixed up with its’ cousin the common speedwell, these tiny white lobed flowers are hard to see.

Baby Blue Eyed and Thyme-leaved Speedwell
Creeping along the ground are the baby blue eyed and thyme-leaved speedwell.

This simple yellow flower is called a Fringed Loosestrife. In May, a large variety of yellow flowers all very seemingly the same blossom along roads, on lawns and in the forest. When you look closely you will find these yellow five petaled flowers are not all the same.

Yellow Fringed Loosestrife
This sweet little yellow flower was found by my driveway.

I hope you have enjoyed my post Colors of May. I’m sure you have seen blossoming colors this month whether it was in the dirt beside the road or in your own gardens. Because I enjoy putting names to flowers I find, I try to observe more nature than time allows. May every day be filled with the colors of nature for you.

Please follow and like us:

First Flowers In Spring

The first flowers in Spring to show their silent beauty were the Lenton roses, English daisies and the delicate white magnolia blossoms. I believe Spring is truly here to stay in New England. Though currently there is a steady rain and heavy mist, we have had sunshine more times often than naught.

Taking advantage of a fresh clear blue sky, I captured the small but fragrant white blossoms on our magnolia tree.

Magnolia In Spring
Short lived fragrant white magnolia flowers

Sun loving English daisies are spreading over our wildflower hill. They are the first wildflowers to bloom this spring. With the white and pink variety, the hill is awash in small flowers.

In the dappled shade of the main garden are the purple bell shaped Lenton roses. Their blooms last so long they sustain color in the garden until the columbine show their variety of colored flowers. This Lenton rose plant is approximately 8 years old. I can’t imagine the garden without it.

Lenton Rose 16
Most favorite spring time blossoms from the Lenton rose

And lastly, the promise of delicious fruit crisps, pies and compotes sit in the noon day sun. As the rhubarb plants gather strength from the sun, I removed their flowers to create a hardier plant to produce tasty stalks.

Rhubarb Leaves
Rhubarb plants in the sunshine
Please follow and like us:

Spring Lilies

Spring is here in New England, though you wouldn’t know it from the snow that was dumped on us yesterday. Here on the coast we received over 8 inches of the sparkling white powder. Within 12 hours the sun was doing what it does best and melting away the last of winter.

What a strange winter we are leaving behind. Warm weather quite early in March has awoken the plants in the garden. Crocus have come and gone, the rhubarb, chocolate mint and columbine show signs of green coming above the dirt. The day lilies (shown below) are surrounded in the last of yesterdays winter. Underneath the white are last Autumn’s leaves to be raked. But for now, I’ll have to wait for the leaves to dry before removing them. I can sit back and enjoy the sun streaming into my windows.

Shoots of green day lily leaves found in the snow.
March’s snow is no match for the sun.
Please follow and like us:

Vinca Vine

It is full on summer now. The air is heavy with humidity, fireflies are rising at dusk and the owl is king at night. Summer also is when the garden is blowing up with riotous colors. Vinca vine creates a carpeted ground cover where ever it flourishes. The waxy green leaves shine underneath the layer of bluish purple petals of the vinca flowers.

Inspired by nature again, I decided to try to capture the colors and shapes of the vinca vine. This squared 12″ x 12″ canvas was the perfect size. I chose to create a background of a complimentary terracotta rust mottled with white. Acrylics are becoming easier now to work with now that the heat has arrived and my studio isn’t so cold.

A painting of a five petaled vinca flower with a green vine and leaves.
Vinca vine is easy to grow and enjoys a shaded area.

If you enjoy art in your home in a functional object may I suggest a beautiful wall clock with my vinca vine painting. Also check out my vinca vine category in my Lasgalen Arts Redbubble store.

 

SaveSave

Please follow and like us:

Orange Day Lilies

In my small town there are many gardens of various sizes. It’s only natural when you live in a wooded area to want to tame a part of your living space and control the environment. The orange day lily has been used for quick color for ages in New England. You will see them in almost every front yard, back gardens and even along the side of a road where no houses stand any longer.

Photograph of orange day lilies.
Day lilies bloom in late June early July.

The reason for the proliferation and longevity of these flowers is because they are passed around from neighbors and relatives freely. Day lilies are easily uprooted by the bucketful and transplanted in just about any environment. Your sister may have bought a new house and she has no color for July, get digging and plant them in the front yard by the rhubarb. Great aunt Jane has passed and her house is up for sale. By God get over there and grab some of her flower plants because it’s a New England right to take heirlooms from her beloved garden. She’d want it that way after all.

Photograph of blooming orange day lilies.
On an overcast day the color of orange is powerful strong.

When I moved into my current house there were hundreds of these orange day lilies lining all four sides of the house and in a small garden. It was quite over whelming to say the least. Since then I’ve transplanted them up the road, given bucketfuls away to friends and even sold them in yard sales.

A photo of orange day lilies.
These day lilies are around five feet tall.

I have too many, that is true, however if I was to get rid of them all I’d probably be thrown out of New England. Perhaps they are a symbol of being part of a community, of showing the people who drive by that someone lives here. Someone takes the time to make sure this garden plot survives the winter or the hot summer humidity.

I don’t mind sharing if you need more. What? You don’t have any? Here, let me get my shovel.

SaveSave

Please follow and like us:

The Dirt Canvas

Lately, now that the weather is fine, I’ve been working on the dirt canvas. It is tough remaining inside the studio when the weather is so lovely. The bare ground is similar to an untouched white canvas. The possibilities are endless with varieties of color or media and really all that is needed is imagination.

Stargazer lilies in a package.
Still in their package, these stargazer lilies await their dirt beds.

The earliest of flowers are the pink and white bleeding hearts. Their delicate ladies bloomers line the slender stems. Several years ago I found these plants growing in the middle of the yard. I transplanted them next to the barn. This year they have fully recovered and are quite large.
Bleeding hearts blooming next to a red barn.
Many blossoms found on these bleeding hearts.

And lastly, four wonderfully healthy tomato plants sit in large pots on the deck. Four varieties include a generic patio tomato, plum, San Marzano and lastly an heirloom called Black Krim.
Four pots of dirt with tomato plants sitting on a wooden deck.
Four pots with tomato plants.

As the season progresses, the garden will come alive with color. Whether green with weeds or bright jewel colored blossoms, it’s a natures plan for its own canvas.

Please follow and like us: