Found Treasure From The Sea

I can’t believe summer has come and gone. Because of our lack of rain September slipped by masking itself in the unusual warm weather. As I sit and look out the window I see a few maple trees already have put on their red leaves. Some trees have lost many leaves while others are still a summer green.

Last weekend I started to clean the garden. Collecting seeds for spring, trimming dead branches and even planting a few new plants. I started by digging a hole for my newly purchased Japanese Anemone. This variety of Anemone caught my eye not only because of the delicate pink flowers but that this plant also blooms in September. With our recent warm weather this Autumn the flowers are still blooming.

Japanese Anemone variety "September Charm"
Japanese Anemone variety “September Charm”.

Creating holes and moving dirt give me a sense of accomplishment. I believe it is the same feeling when painting or any other creative process. The work is more physical than what I do in the art room but has that same lasting vibe of a job well done.

Digging on this property sometimes yields treasure. I’ve dug up colored bottles, kids toys and less exciting objects too. Occasionally I find bits of clam shells or beads. This day I found a rare treat. Three preserved seashells fully intact filled with dirt and buried almost 12 inches deep. Upon washing them I found their brittle shells had worn quite thin. I tried to clean their insides but found the dirt is keeping their shape together.

Three seashells on a post.
Found treasure from the sea

These three seashells stayed on this deck post for several days. One morning I found a squirrel was investigating them. He picked up the two on each end and threw them on the ground. The shell in the middle he took, with difficulty, and hopped away into the woods. I guess he had found his treasure from the sea.

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Colors Of May

The colors of May are varied and numerous. Delicate white, soft pink and bold orange are just a few of the colors of May in our yard. From wildflowers to domestic nursery plants these flowering plants on this post are popping up all around me. Here is a small sample of the colors of May I am sharing with you today.

The first offering are the fragrant white and pink apple blossoms. This apple tree produces lovely flowers each spring though we never seem to have apples to show for it.

Pink and white apple blossoms.
Pink and white apple blossoms are very fragrant.

Blue eyed grass is quite ordinary looking until their small five petaled lavender colored flowers appear. Often found in ditches and along woodland edges, I find them just as lovely as nursery plants in bloom.

Blue eyed grass flowers
Blue eyed grass blossoms provide lovely color in a small way.

This flower of the Mock Olive bush is one of my personal favorites. These small but fragrant blossoms are hard to spot but worth the look. Growing beside the driveway it appears to get larger each year.

Mock olive blossoms
Hung like little white fairy bells the mock olive flowers are so pretty.

The columbine varieties always are prolific in the spring. Below I’ve captured a delicate pink and a large collection of the common purple varieties.

Pale pink columbine.
Delicate pale pink columbine is a spring treat.

Every fall I sprinkle the columbine seed pods all over a stone patio we rarely use. Each spring we see a huge number of these hardy columbine spring into color.

Purple Columbine And  Cedar Shingles
Columbine are easily planted by seed each fall.

This bold orange spike of flowers are called Siberian Wallflowers. I had never seen them until I planted a wildflower mix on a hill I didn’t want to mow any longer. What a surprise to see such colors in May!

Orange Siberian Wallflower
The Siberian Wallflower is anything but quiet.

These two wildflowers are wonderful companions on the wildflower hill. The Baby Blue Eyed and the Thyme-leaved Speedwell grow close to the ground. The thyme-leaved speedwell is found where ever green things grow. Not to be mixed up with its’ cousin the common speedwell, these tiny white lobed flowers are hard to see.

Baby Blue Eyed and Thyme-leaved Speedwell
Creeping along the ground are the baby blue eyed and thyme-leaved speedwell.

This simple yellow flower is called a Fringed Loosestrife. In May, a large variety of yellow flowers all very seemingly the same blossom along roads, on lawns and in the forest. When you look closely you will find these yellow five petaled flowers are not all the same.

Yellow Fringed Loosestrife
This sweet little yellow flower was found by my driveway.

I hope you have enjoyed my post Colors of May. I’m sure you have seen blossoming colors this month whether it was in the dirt beside the road or in your own gardens. Because I enjoy putting names to flowers I find, I try to observe more nature than time allows. May every day be filled with the colors of nature for you.

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She Loved Red Poppies

She Loved Red Poppies is a new venture for me. As someone who is trying to find her voice using paint the outcomes are varied indeed. This particular piece was inspired by a memory and my use of abstract was the backdrop. The background of colorful brush strokes was a twenty minute exercise in combining colors quickly and heavily. The beginning process for this process is explained in the post entitled When One Thing Becomes Another.

As you can see within that first post the colors were quite bright, brighter than what I had envisioned the final painting to look like. Taking sandpaper from my husbands workbench, I gently sanded down the gloss of the acrylic paint. My reasoning to dull down the background was the poppies would shine and stand out from the painting.

An abstract painting that includes large brush strokes and three poppies.
I am quite proud of this painting. Perhaps I will create similar pieces to find my own style.

I think my trick with the sandpaper worked. And enjoyed working on this painting very much. I have been thinking of similar paintings but of course, you never know where my inspiration comes from.

 

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Art Nouveau Floral Mono Prints

A style of art I enjoy creating with linocuts is Art Nouveau. I like the simple lines used to create nature themed designs found on adverts, jewelry and furnishings. Art Nouveau was most popular between 1890-1910. Not only were floral designs part of this style but also curved lines and also architecture.

Closed Lotus Flower With Two Ivy Leaves

mono print of flower and two ivy leaves
This first mono print shown is one I had designed to look like a window you’d find at church. The squared off Tudor arch effect also has two flower buds on either side. The focal point is a lotus flower not yet opened. And lastly an ivy leaf can be seen on the bottom right and left of the lotus stem.

Lotus on a Pedestal

mono print of a lotus flower
I chose green ink to press Lotus on a Pedestal. At the top corners of the print can be seen three leaves. There are three pedestals on the bottom, the center holds a lotus flower while the pedestals on either side hold buds. This green print is one of my first attempts at cutting a linoleum block. Though it may appear crude I still like it. I do enjoy creating Art Nouveau floral mono prints.

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